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Galant schemata – summary

Openings (presentations) The following schemata tend to appear at the opening of themes, often as the framework for a presentation phrase in…

Openings (presentations)

The following schemata tend to appear at the opening of themes, often as the framework for a presentation phrase in a sentence.

*Note: though these schemata are presented in major mode, most of these can be converted directly to minor mode.

The Meyer

stage:1234
melody:dotifami
bass:doretido
thoroughbass:5/34/36/55/3
Roman numerals:IVVI
functions:TDDT

The Jupiter

stage:1234
melody:dorefami
bass:dotitido
thoroughbass:5/36/56/55/3
Roman numerals:IVVI
functions:TDDT

or

stage:1234
melody:dorefami
bass:dosolsoldo
thoroughbass:5/3775/3
Roman numerals:IVVI
functions:TDDT

The Aprile

stage:1234
melody:dotiredo
bass:doretido
thoroughbass:5/34/36/55/3
Roman numerals:IVVI
functions:TDDT

The Pastorella

stage:1234
melody:mirefami
bass:dosolsoldo
thoroughbass:5/3775/3
Roman numerals:IVVI
functions:TDDT

The Do–Re–Mi

Though common in a three-stage version, this four-stage version is more typical when employed in a presentation phrase.

stage:1234
melody:doreremi
bass:dotitido
thoroughbass:5/36/56/55/3
Roman numerals:IVVI
functions:TDDT

(Root-position dominant chords may also be used.)

Sol–Fa–Mi

stage:1234
melody:solfafami
bass:doretido
thoroughbass:5/35/36/55/3
Roman numerals:IIIVI
functions:TSDT

or

stage:1234
melody:solfafami
bass:doretido
thoroughbass:5/36/36/55/3
Roman numerals:IVIIVI
functions:TDDT

The Romanesca

stage:1234
melody:solsoldosol
bass:dotilami
thoroughbass:5/36/35/36/3
Roman numerals:IVVII
functions:TDTxT

The melody of this schema is quite flexible. The bass/harmony are the more definitive elements. Also note that, in contrast to the other “presentation” schemata, this schema is far more common in slower movements.

Continuing schemata

The Prinner

stage:1234
melody:lasolfami
bass:famiredo
thoroughbass:5/36/37–6/35/3
Roman numerals:IVIVIII
functions:STDT

or

stage:12345
melody:lasolfafami
bass:famiresoldo
thoroughbass:5/36/37–6/375/3
Roman numerals:IVIVIIVI
functions:STDDT

The Modulating Prinner

This schema modulates from the tonic to the dominant. It is a common continuation phrase for a modulating sentence. It is also a common framework for a tutti passage that begins the transition module of a sonata/symphony movement.

stage:1234
melody:miredoti
bass:dotilasol
thoroughbass:5/36/37–#6/35/3
Roman numerals:IVVII/VV

or

stage:12345
melody:miredodoti
bass:dotilaresol
thoroughbass:5/36/37–#6/37/#5/3
Roman numerals:IVVII/VV/VV

The Passo Indietro

stage:12
melody:lasol
bass:fami
thoroughbass:5/36/3
Roman numerals:IVI
functions:ST

This is essentially the first two stages of a Prinner. The latter two stages are often elided (cut away) in order to make room for a cadence pattern.

Like the Prinner, the Passo Indietro has a “modulating version” (the first two stages of the Modulating Prinner).

stage:12
melody:mire
bass:doti
thoroughbass:5/36/3
Roman numerals:IV

Cadences

The Simple PAC

stage:12
melody:redo
bass:soldo
thoroughbass:(7)5/3
Roman numerals:VI
functions:DT

The Simple IAC

stage:12
melody:fami
bass:soldo
thoroughbass:75/3
Roman numerals:VI
functions:DT

The fa–fi–sol HC

This is a common approach to a half cadence, especially at the end of a sonata movement’s transition (TR) module. The definitive element is the bass line: fafisol. The redoti melody is common, and the most active of the possibilities that fit the harmonies. See Mozart’s K. 545, I., mm. 10–11, and K. 333, I., mm. 17–18, for examples.

stage:123
melody:redoti
bass:fafisol
thoroughbass:6/36/5(7)
Roman numerals:IIV/VV
functions:SSD

The Compound PAC

stage:123
melody:miredo
bass:solsoldo
thoroughbass:(8)/6/4(7)5/3
Roman numerals:Cad.VI
functions:DDT

The Compound IAC

stage:123
melody:solfami
bass:solsoldo
thoroughbass:8/6/475/3
Roman numerals:Cad.VI
functions:DDT

The Compound HC

stage:12
melody:mire
bass:solsol
thoroughbass:6/45/3
Roman numerals:Cad.V
functions:DD

(The Compound HC can be approached by any S chord, or even the end of the tonic prolongational zone.)

There are, of course, more cadence patterns than these, but these are the most straightforward for framing an improvisation, or a simple model composition. See Classical cadence types for more details about standard cadential patterns.

Galant schemata – summary
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